« Notes from Nice (5): Big hole | Main | Notes from Nice (7): European landers »

Comments

Charles Schmidt

Pardon me for going off-topic; Endurance crater entices, beginning to share it's secrets about the history of Terra Meridiani. You can clearly see three main units in the wall, the top one looking like the salty bedrock unit in Eagle crater, followed by a darker unit that could be volcanic, then something else which is less clear. There is some interesting erosion also in the walls, and a few meter-wide fresh craters in the bowl. While I am obviously not a geologist, I am nevertheless puzzled as to what happened to Endurance's ejecta blanket. Did the boulders just disintegrate into small grains and blow away? The site is as clean as a whistle.

https://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/opportunity/20040430a/1NN094EFF19CYL00P1829L000M1-B095R1.jpg

Hussain

There are alot of landfills ndowaays which are using that emitted methane gas for a good purpose. For years now landfills have been required to cap the landfills and collect the methane gas (at least in the US, USEPA regulations), they would then flare it off , which is a fancy way of saying they would burn it so methane wasn't emitted. Fortunately, a bunch of smart people realized this was stupid and decided to make a dollar off of it.A great example close to home for me is the University of New Hampshire's EcoLine project. In an agreement with Waste Management Inc., they are piping methane gas from the local landfill to the university who uses it for cogenerateion (heating and electric needs). This project has reduced the Universities electric and heating bills by 80%!!!Poop power is all over the place ndowaays and is becoming more and more practical; landfills, farms, and wastewater treatment facilites. And you want to know the best part, the methanogenesis process used can turn all that poop into fertilizer!

The comments to this entry are closed.